What Are The Symptoms Of A Vitamin C Deficiency? Here Is What To Know

Let’s find out ‘What Are The Symptoms Of A Vitamin C Deficiency?’ The consumption of key vitamins is required for a healthy immune system, however many people lack the nutrients required for general wellbeing.

According to a research presented at the National Library of Medicine, “Micronutrients including vitamins A, C, D, E, and zinc play many roles in the immune system, but the US population generally consumes insufficient amounts of these nutrients. Numerous studies have shown that nutrient deficiencies can weaken the immune response and affect immune function.”

 

What Are The Symptoms Of A Vitamin C Deficiency? Here Is What To Know
What Are The Symptoms Of A Vitamin C Deficiency? Here Is What To Know

 

“45% of the U.S. population had a prevalence of insufficiency for vitamin A, 46% for vitamin C, 95% for vitamin D, 84% for vitamin E, and 15% for zinc,” according to the research, which monitored 26,282 persons for 19 years. For a few reasons, vitamin deficits are frequently seen. One is if you consume an unbalanced diet and neglect to include certain food groups, such as meat, fish, vegetables, or fruit. Two, some vitamins can be difficult for some people to absorb due to illnesses like Crohn’s disease.

One essential nutrient that we all require is vitamin C, says Mighty Health’s health coach Lindsay Tullis, CHC “Depending on age and gender, different vitamin C daily intakes are advised. The RDI is 90 mg for adult males and 75 mg for adult women per day.” Consume This, Not That! Experts who were consulted by Health explain vitamin C deficiency symptoms and what you should know about it. As always, if you need medical advice, contact your doctor.

 

Why Vitamin C Is Vital

Why Vitamin C Is Vital
Why Vitamin C Is Vital

 

In Tullis’ words, “Vitamin C is crucial for development and growth. It is necessary for tissue development and repair, assists in the formation of scar tissue and the healing of wounds, and facilitates the absorption of iron. Antioxidants like vitamin C prevent some of the harm caused by free radicals.”

As per the Mayo Clinic, “Your body requires vitamin C (ascorbic acid) to produce blood vessels, cartilage, muscle, and collagen in bones. The healing process in your body depends on vitamin C as well. The antioxidant vitamin C works to shield your cells from the damaging effects of free radicals, which are molecules your body produces as it breaks down food, is exposed to tobacco smoke, or is exposed to radiation from the sun, X-rays, or other sources. Heart disease, cancer, and other illnesses might be caused by free radicals. Additionally, iron storage and absorption are aided by vitamin C.”

According to Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, “Vitamin C is a potent antioxidant that may disarm dangerous free radicals and aid in the healing of wounds and infections. It is required for the production of collagen, a fibrous protein found in connective tissue and woven throughout the neurological, immunological, bone, cartilage, blood, and other systems in the body. The vitamin aids in the production of several hormones and chemical messengers that are employed in the brain and nerves.”

 

A Vitamin C Deficiency Can Be Harmful

A Vitamin C Deficiency Can Be Harmful
A Vitamin C Deficiency Can Be Harmful

 

Vitamin C is utilized to prevent scurvy, according to Nima Majlesi, DO, Director of Medical Toxicology at Staten Island University Hospital. Scurvy is a condition marked by gingivitis, slow wound recovery, bleeding, and easily bruised skin.

In addition to causing spontaneous bleeding in muscles and joints, scurvy can also cause discomfort in the muscles and joints. In the West, where nearly all of our foods are fortified with vitamin C, this condition is quite uncommon.

However, people who have inadequate diets fortified with vitamin C, such as the elderly, alcoholics, and newborns who are fed formula without vitamin C fortification, are at danger. Generally speaking, 500 mg of vitamin C per day should be sufficient to stave against scurvy. The majority of this comes from the foods we eat. Supplementation is common and generally safe, but.

 

Signs Of A Vitamin C Deficiency

Signs Of A Vitamin C Deficiency
Signs Of A Vitamin C Deficiency

 

Tullis claims: “Anemia, swollen and aching joints, a weakened immune system, and gingivitis are all warning signs of a vitamin C deficiency. The creation of collagen, a few neurotransmitters, epinephrine, and the process of steroidogenesis are only a few of the numerous jobs that vitamin C-ascorbic acid does. Scurvy, which is caused by deficiency and is relatively uncommon in developed nations but has symptoms like bleeding gums, slow wound healing, and abnormal bone development, is caused by deficiency.”

According to Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, vitamin C insufficiency can happen if a person consumes fewer than 10 mg of the vitamin every day for a month or more. The highest risk factors for deficiency in industrialized nations are eating a diet low in fruits and vegetables, smoking or prolonged exposure to secondhand smoke, and abusing drugs and alcohol. The most typical indications of a deficit are listed below.

The symptoms of scurvy, the primary illness associated with severe vitamin C deficiency, are brought on by the loss of collagen, which weakens connective tissues:

–Skin spots caused by bleeding and bruising from broken blood vessels

–Swelling or bleeding of gums, and eventual loss of teeth

–Hair loss

–Delayed healing of skin wounds

–Fatigue, malaise

–Iron-deficiency anemia due to decreased absorption of non-heme iron”

 

You Can Get Vitamin C From Several Different Foods Sources

You Can Get Vitamin C From Several Different Foods Sources
You Can Get Vitamin C From Several Different Foods Sources

 

Vitamin C must come from your food since your body cannot make it, according to the Mayo Clinic. Citrus fruits, berries, potatoes, tomatoes, peppers, cabbage, Brussels sprouts, broccoli, and spinach all contain vitamin C. The most common forms of vitamin C oral supplements are capsules and chewable pills.

A balanced diet usually provides adequate vitamin C for most individuals. A lack of vitamin C is more likely in those who:

–Smoke or are exposed to secondhand smoking

–Have certain gastrointestinal conditions or certain types of cancer

–Have a limited diet that doesn’t regularly include fruits and vegetables.”

 

The Risk Of Taking Vitamin C

The Risk Of Taking Vitamin C
The Risk Of Taking Vitamin C

 

The only possible concern associated with consuming too much vitamin C orally, according to Dr. Majlesi, is the development of kidney stones. Thoughts on this are divided. Theoretically, there is some worry that people taking 1000 mg or more are more likely to absorb oxalate and have high urine oxalate concentrations.

Additionally, using it was linked to a twofold rise in the incidence of kidney stones. Oxalate stones have also been reported to appear when vitamin C is administered intravenously.

High vitamin C dosages can also cause localized esophagitis and diarrhea. However, in general, vitamin C is a fairly safe vitamin. Extra vitamin C is effectively excreted in persons with healthy kidneys. It is advisable to take vitamin C on an empty stomach to achieve maximum absorption. Therefore, it makes the most sense to exercise first thing in the morning when you wake up and 30 minutes before breakfast.

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